Mobile is the new face of engagement

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Photo from JDHancock

New Forrester Research Report:

1 billion consumers will own smartphones by 2016, with U.S. users owning 257 million smartphones and 126 million tablets.

By 2016, 350 million employees will use smartphones, with 200 million of them bringing their own.

Mobile spending will reach $1.3 trillion by 2016, or 35 percent of the technology economy, with the app market generating $56 billion by 2015.

Apple, Google and Microsoft are expected to control 91 percent of the U.S. smartphone market and 98 percent of the U.S. tablet market by 2016.

Businesses are expected to double their spending on mobile projects by 2015.


The Social Graph is neither…

Rdf hell

Put simply, my most shared/forwarded article of 2011 although coming late – Nov.

I’m a big user of pinboard and a fan.

Let’s just say it’s a must read.

It’s not a graph – “When you start talking about building a social graph that transcends any specific implementation, you quickly find yourself in the weeds. Is accepting someone’s invitation on LinkedIn the same kind of connection as mutually following them on Twitter? Can we define some generic connections like ‘fan of’ or ‘follower’ and re-use them for multiple sites? Does it matter that you can see who your followers are on site X but not on site Y? … This is supposed to be a canonical representation of human relationships. But it only takes five minutes of reading the existing standards to see that they’re completely inadequate”

Privacy is another sticking point which I think will be a massive portent of things to come

“There’s another fundamental problem in that a graph is a static thing, with no concept of time. Real life relationships are a shared history, but in the social graph they’re just a single connection.”

Declaring relationships explicitly is a social act: “Your best friend from high school surfaces and sends a friend request. Do you just click accept, or do you send a little message? Or do you ignore him because you don’t want to deal with the awkward situation? Declaring connections is about as much fun as trying to whittle people from a guest list, with the added stress that social networking is too new for us to have shared social conventions around it.”

Leaving aside the technical issues of how to implement, how does cutting ties actually work socially? Is there any way to be discreet, for example, or have connections naturally degrade over time? In real life, all relationships fade naturally if you don’t maintain them, but right now social networks preserve ties in amber until we explicitly break them.

“Social networks exist to sell you crap. The icky feeling you get when your friend starts to talk to you about Amway, or when you spot someone passing out business cards at a birthday party, is the entire driving force behind a site like Facebook.”

And my favourite : “The funny thing is, no one’s really hiding the secret of how to make awesome online communities. Give people something cool to do and a way to talk to each other, moderate a little bit, and your job is done.”

“My hope is that whatever replaces Facebook and Google+ will look equally inevitable, and that our kids will think we were complete rubes for ever having thrown a sheep or clicked a +1 button. It’s just a matter of waiting things out, and leaving ourselves enough freedom to find some interesting, organic, and human ways to bring our social lives online.”

Amen.


Killing The Myth Of The Average Consumer

047 Symphony orchestra
(image from here)

Very interesting Fast Company article about discarding the idea of an ‘Average Customer’.

“It turns out the secret to unlocking demand for classical music–as for most products–is discarding the Myth of the Average Customer. Designing a product offer to appeal to one archetypal customer is always wasteful–one size fits few, not all. Instead, demand creators have to constantly focus on demand variation, asking how customers differ from one another and how those differences impact demand.”

With regard to orchestras, and following some rigorous research:

“It turns out the quality of the orchestra, magnificence of the hall, and virtuosity of the conductor were not particularly important attributes. What was? Drum roll!

The most powerful “driver of revisitation” was parking! As with other orchestras, veteran members of the core BSO audience had figured out where to park, but trialists identified it as a huge hassle–so they didn’t come back.

Another driver was the ability to exchange tickets; trialists found the “no refunds, no exchanges” policy a deal breaker.”

The process of ‘de-averaging’ offers big opportunities.


Mobile Money

Simply the best summary I have seen so far.

Shamelessly ripped from fast company.

Mobile Money

It its a bit squinty and/or you can’t be bothered screengrabbing yourself, drop me a mail and I’ll send you mine…

Basically Apple/Google will fight it out after everyone gets sidelined due to great consumer relationships, retailer pull and market leading smartphones. (Spoiler alert) And the Googleplex will probably win.


Rise of Social Commerce

Screen shot 2012 01 11 at 15 42 20

Specifically a Supply Chain Point of View on the new channel from the rather dodgily titled ‘supply chain shaman‘. (Oh dear. Add another one to the ‘first up against the wall when the real revolution comes’ along with the Advocates, Gurus, Jedi and Ninjas (blackbelt in stupid anyone?)

Notwithstanding, a good list of what comprises social commerce:

Geospatial.
Gaming.
Mobile Applications.
2-D Bar Codes.
Virtual Currency.
Shopping with Friends.
Facebook as a Channel.

As well as a good list of why supply chain should care”:

Redefinition of customer service.
New ways to sell to loyal shoppers.
Channel proliferation.
A new need for new type of supply chain transparency.

In essence a plea for departments outside of Marketing to welcome the digital consumer.

Bang your drum shaman.


Notice me

CD noticeme1 front

image from here

A real diamond amongst the pile of shiny things that is Seth Godin. I couldn’t agree more.

Notice me

If the new web has a mantra, that’s it.

So much time and effort is now put into finding followers, accumulating comments and generating controversy… all so that people will notice you. People say and do things that don’t benefit them, just because they’re hooked on attention.

Attention is fine, as long as you have a goal that is reached in exchange for all this effort.

Far better than being noticed:

Trusted
Engaged with
Purchased from
Discussed
Echoed
Teaching us
Leading

However what I would like discussed is whether the items on the list lead to being noticed… ?


Mobile phones dominate in South Africa

South africa tech

From the Neilsen blog.

As I spend half my time there and its where my family live, here’s some really interesting stats:

More Africans have access to mobile phones than to clean drinking water

In South Africa, the continent’s strongest economy, mobile phone use has gone from 17 percent of adults in 2000 to 76 percent in 2010.

Today, more South Africans – 29 million – use mobile phones than radio (28 million), TV (27 million) or personal computers (6 million).

Only 5 million South Africans use landline phones.

Quite staggering